xnotpossible:

holnnes:

How to Britpick your own fanfiction by an English Sherlockian who get unreasonably annoyed when people use the wrong slang

Other useful links:

(Of course this doesn’t just apply to Sherlock, but any British characters.) 

I would like to add a few things.

Firstly, it is more common to find Primary schools than Infants & Junior schools, but most Primary schools are split into Infants and Juniors internally (They’re the same school but have a separate playground for infantas and juniors, and it’s always a big deal when you go up to the juniors).
Also, I have never heard anyone refer to the school you go to after Primary as Senior school. In my experience it’s more commonly called Secondary school or Comprehensive school (comp for short). The difference between sixth form and college is that sixth form is basically the same as comp, but in college you get way more freedom.

We also have various bank holidays throughout the year, and it would be best for you to google them. In Wales we have Saint David’s day which is a big thing, but England doesn’t have that. There’s also Saint Patrick’s day in Ireland and I think St George’s day in England, but I’m not sure how big those two are. Also in schools there are teacher training days (more commonly called inset days) where the kids don’t go to school.

You can also call your grandma nanna.

Also for the love of God remember that the temperature is different. I once read a fanfic where the author literally said ‘It was a cool 85 degree summer day and so they were having a BBQ outside’. Like no. 85 degrees is bloody boiling here. No one will be outside having a BBQ. They will be inside in front of their fans. We rarely get weather this hot though. Like probably not even once a year will it go to 85 degrees.

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iainbroome:

Do you need a literary agent?

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hanoverdarling:

merchandice:

wittacism:

It’s essay writing season for tons of students!

After being a college writing tutor for over a year, I thought I would share my advice with all you awesome people on tumblr. This is how I write essays, but if you’ve got more tips, feel free to add them below. 

Happy writing. You can do it!

this is really good except please do not ever ever ever use the sentence ‘in this essay i will’ or any variation of it. It makes your essay seem unacademic

Leaving my friends watching Gilmore girls to go do this!

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medievalpoc:

Hiya,
I’ve started a new tumblr to share free/open nonfiction ebooks made available by the publisher.
Lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com
The first few titles include
as well as some titles that deal with 20th history
I’d be grateful if you could let your readers know
Cheers
This is an absolute GEM of a tumblr! Thank you so much for letting me know and sharing these FREE BOOKS with everyone!! I have added links in above.
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The Worst Ways to Begin Your Novel: Advice from Literary Agents - The Write Life

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faeryhearts:

In the Victorian era, hand-fans were used not only to cool oneself but also as a secret way to communicate the language of love. For example, by running one’s fingers through the fan’s ribs, one is trying to say, "I want to talk to you." The enigmatic language of the fan was widely used by both men and women.I. A fan placed near the heart."You have won my love."II. A closed fan touching the right eye."When may I be allowed to see you?"III. A closed fan moved threateningly."Do not act so impudently!"IV. A half-opened fan pressed to the lips."You may kiss me."V. Covering the left ear with an open fan."Do not betray my secret."VI. Hiding the eyes behind an open fan."I love you."VII. Shutting a fully open fan slowly."I promise to marry you."VIII. Fanning oneself slowly."I am married."IX. Letting one’s fan rest on the right cheek or the left."Yes" and "No", interchangeably.X. Opening and closing the fan several times."You are cruel."XI. Fan in front of the face."Follow me."XII. Twirling the fan in the left hand."We are being watched."XIII. Fan held over left ear."I wish to be rid of you."XIV. Carrying an open fan in the left hand."Come and talk to me."XV. Opening a fan wide."Wait for me."XVI. Placing the fan behind the head with finger."Goodbye."[Artwork: Secret, by Lee Yun-hi.]

faeryhearts:

In the Victorian era, hand-fans were used not only to cool oneself but also as a secret way to communicate the language of love. For example, by running one’s fingers through the fan’s ribs, one is trying to say, "I want to talk to you." The enigmatic language of the fan was widely used by both men and women.

I. A fan placed near the heart.
"You have won my love."

II. A closed fan touching the right eye.
"When may I be allowed to see you?"

III. A closed fan moved threateningly.
"Do not act so impudently!"

IV. A half-opened fan pressed to the lips.
"You may kiss me."

V. Covering the left ear with an open fan.
"Do not betray my secret."

VI. Hiding the eyes behind an open fan.
"I love you."

VII. Shutting a fully open fan slowly.
"I promise to marry you."

VIII. Fanning oneself slowly.
"I am married."

IX. Letting one’s fan rest on the right cheek or the left.
"Yes" and "No", interchangeably.

X. Opening and closing the fan several times.
"You are cruel."

XI. Fan in front of the face.
"Follow me."

XII. Twirling the fan in the left hand.
"We are being watched."

XIII. Fan held over left ear.
"I wish to be rid of you."

XIV. Carrying an open fan in the left hand.
"Come and talk to me."

XV. Opening a fan wide.
"Wait for me."

XVI. Placing the fan behind the head with finger.
"Goodbye."




[Artwork: Secret, by Lee Yun-hi.]

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srboe asked

I have a difficult time knowing when to stop revising. Everytime I sit down to my novel, which is written and been revised, line-edited, read by others, etc. I want to revise AGAIN. When do you know it is time to stop? When do you finally say, enough? I actually really enjoy the revision process, but how do know when you've done enough?


fixyourwritinghabits:

Here’s some thoughts that just crossed my dash. I would highly emphasize the last point. If you’ve lost the joy, you’re done. You can always go back later. 

http://anomalously-written.tumblr.com/post/100002767836/self-editing-when-is-enough-enough

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The Shitty First Draft: A Guide

awritersknot:

First drafts are shitty and they’re supposed to be shitty. If you think your first draft is as sharp, hard and pretty as a diamond, then pls. Look again. Seriously. Look again. At least have someone else look for you. Listen to them if not me. You want a shitty first draft….

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socimages:

Map of the week: 57% of languages do not have gendered pronouns.
By Lisa Wade, PhD
The map above is an interactive available at the World Atlas of Language Structures.  It represents an extensive, but not quite comprehensive collection of world languages. Each dot represents one. White dots are languages that do not include gendered pronouns. No “he” or “she.” Just a gender neutral word that means person.
The colored dots refer to languages with gendered pronouns, but there are more than one kind, as indicated by the Values key. The number on the right, further, indicates how many languages fit into each group. Notice that the majority of languages represented here (57%) DO NOT have gendered pronouns.
The map at the site is interactive. Go there to click on those dots and explore.
Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

socimages:

Map of the week: 57% of languages do not have gendered pronouns.

By Lisa Wade, PhD

The map above is an interactive available at the World Atlas of Language Structures.  It represents an extensive, but not quite comprehensive collection of world languages. Each dot represents one. White dots are languages that do not include gendered pronouns. No “he” or “she.” Just a gender neutral word that means person.

The colored dots refer to languages with gendered pronouns, but there are more than one kind, as indicated by the Values key. The number on the right, further, indicates how many languages fit into each group. Notice that the majority of languages represented here (57%) DO NOT have gendered pronouns.

3The map at the site is interactive. Go there to click on those dots and explore.

Lisa Wade is a professor of sociology at Occidental College and the co-author of Gender: Ideas, Interactions, Institutions. You can follow her on Twitter and Facebook.

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The 2014 Horatio Nelson Fiction Prize

blackballoonpublishing:

Do you have a novel or a collection of short stories that the world just needs to read?

image

Well, listen up. We have a writing prize that’s going to blow your socks off.

image

We know, we know. Whenever you hear “writing prize,” you’re all:

image

But trust us—we…

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thatssometal-rph:


Talking about The ‘Burgh (Pittsburgh, PA)

I’ve been living in Pittsburgh for almost four years now and I’ve only seen one roleplay take place in Pittsburgh. Let’s change that, shall we? This guide will cover everything you need to know about the city, including: sports, food, sights, and slang. If you’d like me to add something or spot any discrepancies, please message me off-anon and I’ll gladly fix them. Warning: Image heavy. (Last Updated: 9/21/14)
Read More

thatssometal-rph:

Talking about The ‘Burgh (Pittsburgh, PA)

I’ve been living in Pittsburgh for almost four years now and I’ve only seen one roleplay take place in Pittsburgh. Let’s change that, shall we? This guide will cover everything you need to know about the city, including: sports, food, sights, and slang. If you’d like me to add something or spot any discrepancies, please message me off-anon and I’ll gladly fix them. Warning: Image heavy. (Last Updated: 9/21/14)

Read More

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ultrafacts:

Source If you want more facts, follow Ultrafacts

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4 Common Mistakes Writers Make On Their Author Websites

writersrelief:

An author website is one of the most effective marketing tools for a writer. It has the potential to turn a random visitor to your website into a full-fledged fan of your writing. But in order to get to that coveted place of sold-out book signings and ten-thousand blog subscribers (okay, sorry, we’re getting a little ahead of ourselves), you’ll want to avoid these four common mistakes writers make on their author websites.

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317 Power Words That'll Instantly Make You a Better Writer

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lilymoth:

Legendary Creatures: Asrai

Asrai are a type of aquatic fairy. Some sources describe them as timid and shy, standing only between two and four feet tall, while others depict them as tall and lithe.They are said to look like beautiful young maidens, sometimes as young as children, while actually being hundreds of years old. They may have webbed hands and feet, resembling some descriptions of selkies.
If an Asrai is seen by a man, her beauty is so great that, according to folklore, the man will instantly wish to capture her. The Asrai are as deathly afraid of capture as they are of the sun, because if captured or if a single ray of sunlight touches them, it is said that they die and turn into a pool of water. They are, however, said to enjoy bathing in the moonlight. [x]

lilymoth:

Legendary Creatures: Asrai

Asrai are a type of aquatic fairy. Some sources describe them as timid and shy, standing only between two and four feet tall, while others depict them as tall and lithe.They are said to look like beautiful young maidens, sometimes as young as children, while actually being hundreds of years old. They may have webbed hands and feet, resembling some descriptions of selkies.

If an Asrai is seen by a man, her beauty is so great that, according to folklore, the man will instantly wish to capture her. The Asrai are as deathly afraid of capture as they are of the sun, because if captured or if a single ray of sunlight touches them, it is said that they die and turn into a pool of water. They are, however, said to enjoy bathing in the moonlight. [x]

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TDK