10 Great Resources for Writing Cross-Culturally

diversityinya:

tubooks:

Our editors often get asked for advice on writing cross-culturally, so we thought we’d round up some of the best links on the subject. Writing cross-culturally means writing about a culture that isn’t your own (and in this definition of culture, we include…

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Let's get hairy

thewritershelpers:

Describing appearance is something a lot of you struggle with and it is something I struggle with, especially when I’m trying to describe truthfully without making it boring or overly elaborate. Hair however I find even more tiresome to describe. I find it especially…

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Writing Feminist Male Protagonists

kaylapocalypse:

In general, I prefer to write male protagonists.

I have nothing against female protagonists at all, I just feel that it’s important to make boy characters that were designed with Feminist Ideology in mind.

I dont feel like our commercial children’s literature is…

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nat-sg:

artist-refs:

Islamic Headscarves by ArsalanKhanArtist

Heck yeah, I needed to know about this.

nat-sg:

artist-refs:

Islamic Headscarves by ArsalanKhanArtist

Heck yeah, I needed to know about this.

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Writing Feminist Male Protagonists

kaylapocalypse:

In general, I prefer to write male protagonists.

I have nothing against female protagonists at all, I dearly love them. I just feel that it’s important to make boy characters that were designed with Feminist Ideology in mind too.

I dont feel like our commercial…

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science-junkie:

Good news for all survivalists!

 Need a water filter? Peel a tree branch

If you’ve run out of drinking water during a lakeside camping trip, there’s a simple solution: Break off a branch from the nearest pine tree, peel away the bark, and slowly pour lake water through the stick. The improvised filter should trap any bacteria, producing fresh, uncontaminated water.

In fact, an MIT team has discovered that this low-tech filtration system can produce up to four liters of drinking water a day — enough to quench the thirst of a typical person.

In a paper published this week in the journal PLoS ONE, the researchers demonstrate that a small piece of sapwood can filter out more than 99 percent of the bacteria E. coli from water. They say the size of the pores in sapwood — which contains xylem tissue evolved to transport sap up the length of a tree — also allows water through while blocking most types of bacteria.

Read more

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thebluebird:

A professional script reader read 300 screenplays for five different studios, all the while tracking the many recurring problems. The infographic he made with the collected data offers a glimpse at where screenwriting goes wrong.

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Red Flags for Female Characters

freedoms-progress:

1. If something would be boring and/or undramatic for a male character, it would probably be boring and/or undramatic for a female character. If you’re writing a female character (particularly in a major role), I’d recommend thinking about whether you’d want to read…

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selcouthpharaoh:

y-como-es-el:

 

I hate when people refer to Africa as if there aren’t individual countries in the continent

selcouthpharaoh:

y-como-es-el:

 

I hate when people refer to Africa as if there aren’t individual countries in the continent

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"

Don’t ever use the word ‘soul,’ if possible. Never quote dialogue you can summarize. Avoid describing crowd scenes but especially party scenes.

[…]

If you’re doing your job, the reader feels what you felt. You don’t have to tell the reader how to feel. No one likes to be told how to feel about something. And if you doubt that, just go ahead. Try and tell someone how to feel.

[…]

You want vivid writing. How do we get vivid writing? Verbs, first. Precise verbs. All of the action on the page, everything that happens, happens in the verbs. The passive voice needs gerunds to make anything happen. But too many gerunds together on the page makes for tinnitus: Running, sitting, speaking, laughing, inginginginging. No. Don’t do it. The verbs tell a reader whether something happened once or continually, what is in motion, what is at rest. Gerunds are lazy, you don’t have to make a decision and soon, everything is happening at the same time, pell-mell, chaos. Don’t do that. Also, bad verb choices mean adverbs. More often than not, you don’t need them. Did he run quickly or did he sprint? Did he walk slowly or did he stroll or saunter?

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Alexander Chee reminisces about studying with Annie Dillard and shares her best writing advice. For the horse’s mouth, see Dillard herself on writing – a fine addition to our ongoing archive of notable wisdom on the craft. (via referenceforwriters)

Omg the last part.

(via yeahwriters)

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howtofightwrite:

kellysue:

prettyarbitrary:

fuckyourwritinghabits:

swegener:

Speaking of different body shapes. These are all basically peak human bodies. 

How come 99% of them don’t conform to what the entertainment industry tells us is the perfect body?

Time to bring back this body reference sheet!

One of the better body references I’ve ever seen.  All of these people are ridiculously fit, operating in the top echelons of their sports world-wide.  But there’s a vast array of body types, and types of fitness.

I know this is off point, but Table Tennis dude is my favorite. 

This is a great body reference and exceedingly important to really grasping how different kinds of training mold the body. It goes far beyond just what we are born with or the limited to in what entertainment media and Hollywood presents. This is specifically sports and fitness, not combat, but it should give you some ideas.

-Michi

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HOW TO FINISH A BOOK

maureenjohnsonbooks:

I answered this question yesterday, and have been asked to make it rebloggable. SO HERE IT IS:

I write a lot, I’ve been told by a lot of people that i’m good, some say i’m even good enough to get published. My only problem is that i reach about half way into…
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The Importance of The Unlikable Heroine

gingerhaze:

clairelegrand:

I’ve always had this tendency to apologize for everything—even things that aren’t my fault, things that actually hurt me or were wrongs against me.

It’s become automatic, a compulsion I am constantly fighting. Even more disturbingly, I’ve discovered in conversations with my female friends that…

Oh, this is fantastic. Long post, but read the whole thing. Unlikeable heroines 4eva.

These are the “difficult” characters. They demand our love but they won’t make it easy. The unlikable heroine provokes us. She is murky and muddled. We don’t always understand her. She may not flaunt her flaws but she won’t deny them. She experiences moral dilemmas, and most of the time recognizes when she has done something wrong, but in the meantime she will let herself be angry, and it isn’t endearing, cute, or fleeting. It is mighty and it is terrifying. It puts her at odds with her surroundings, and it isn’t always easy for readers to swallow.

She isn’t always courageous. She may not be conventionally strong; her strength may be difficult to see. She doesn’t always stand up for herself, or for what is right. She is not always nice. She is a hellion, a harpy, a bitch, a shrew, a whiner, a crybaby, a coward. She lies even to herself.

In other words, she fails to walk the fine line we have drawn for our heroines, the narrow parameters in which a heroine must exist to achieve that elusive “likability.”

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perplexingly:

There’s always space for yet another armor tutorial, right? (ノ´ヮ´)ノ*:・゚✧

Note that the armor I drew would be worn around 15th century, the more into the future the less and less components knight’s armor had (i. e. in early 14th century instead of greaves a knight would wear long boots only; in 12th century knights didn’t wear plate breastplates and instead a chain mail only). Also the design of armor pattern changed by year and was different in every country (i.e. in eastern Europe armors, while still looking European, were heavily influenced by Turkey). so just make sure you always do research whenever drawing an armor. And one more thing to keep in mind is that armors were expensive, knights wearing a full plate armor weren’t an often sight.

Some links that may be useful:

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TDK